(Podcast) Episode 029: Trade, Trade, and More Trade

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Anton and Eric chat with Dr. Amanda Countryman, associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Colorado State University. The discussion focuses on all things trade. Dr. Countryman’s research focuses on agricultural trade issues, and we cover topics, including an overview of current trade negotiations, the role of the World Trade Organization, the recently negotiated USMCA, and to what extent US agricultural can withstand the economic impacts of temporary or potentially permanent trade restrictions.

Highlights:

2:01: What’s the basic background on where we’ve been and where we are in the current trade negotiation timeline? How does trade affect domestic farm incomes?

8:40: How did we get to perhaps the most important dispute for US agriculture: the conflict with China?

15:25: How does the World Trade Organization set up and how is it supposed to deal with trade disputes?

21:15: What’s the deal with USMCA? What changed from NAFTA?

24:45: What does USMCA have in store for northern US wheat and its potential for being sold in Canada?

27:00: When are these trade disputes going to end? The experts take their best guess.

(Intro and outro music is from “Out of It” by andrewbowden licensed under CC BY 3.0)

(Photo by Thomas_H_photo is licensed under CC BY 4.0)

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About Author

Dr. Anton Bekkerman is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics at Montana State University, joining the faculty in 2009 after completing his PhD at North Carolina State University. Bekkerman's primary areas of research are grain marketing, basis and price forecast modeling, understanding how grain prices are affected by changes in supply chain infrastructures and quality demands, and analyzing the economic trade-offs of adopting alternative dryland cropping systems in Montana. One of his current projects is an investigation of how new grain loading technologies are affecting prices that Montana farmers receive for their wheat. Bekkerman is also examining the economic impacts that Montana's rapidly expanding dry pulse industry will have on the state's crop industry. Although Bekkerman grew up on the east coast, he has recently made a small step toward production agricultural after acquiring three backyard chickens.

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